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white weed seeds

White Widow is widely regarded as the queen of the ‘White’ family. She has often been used to form other ‘white strains’ or share genetic material with other ‘white’ varieties. Other denominators are that white strains are covered in trichomes, have a high THC level resulting in a powerful high. Popular white strains include Snow White, White Widow and Amnesia Haze x White Widow.

White weed is delicious, and often less intense than other varieties, so it is good for indoor or stealth grows. White strains are normally Indica-dominant and grow thick, bushy colas and have a rapid flowering phase. Even though most white strains are directly descended from White Widow, this isn’t always true – some white varieties are classed as White because of their high resin content.

The white color in cannabis occurs in nature occasionally, as a consequence of a double recessive gene responsible for the absence of chlorophyll or because of a genetic mutation of the genes involved in pigmentation.

Are white weed seeds female?

White Widow is classed as relatively easy to grow, and she is very resistant to mold. You can grow White Widow in northern climates as she tends to grow similarly to an Indica, despite her Sativa-dominant genetics. Use techniques, such as topping, to allow light to reach all areas of the plant to maximize yields. Allow White Widow sufficient flowering time, and you’ll reap rich rewards!

A double recessive gene causes absolutely white plants, although this is extremely rare; and in the second case, the bud or a part of the plant is affected by the mutation. Another possible explanation is the non-conformity between nuclear and chloroplast genomes.

Many growers have heard the myth that white weed seeds are not as viable as black or brown seeds and are less likely to germinate. This is entirely untrue. At Weedseedsexpress, we have undertaken numerous germination tests and are completely confident in their quality. In fact, our test revealed that white seeds are more likely to germinate sooner than black seeds which has been confirmed by numerous of other seed banks

The short answer is ‘yes’. Most cannabis seeds are dark brown, but some are a silvery white and grow into beautiful plants with frosted white buds and even leaves that are laced with white.

Remember, just like animals and other living things, cannabis seeds are biologically different from one another (even if they are technically the same strain) and therefore will exhibit different physical characteristics. Don’t let these natural differences fool you into thinking that a larger, rounder, and darker seed (for example) is of better quality than a lighter, smaller, and more oval-shaped one.

Quality seeds are the key to healthy plants and good harvests. While proper feeding/watering and good light quality obviously also affect the health and yield potential of your plants, starting a grow with top-shelf genetics is equally, if not more important. But how exactly do you tell quality cannabis seeds apart from the rest? In this article, we’ll show you exactly how to spot top-quality cannabis seeds, avoid duds, and start your grow off right.

Growing Seeds From A Bag (Bagseed)

However, slight patience is required when conducting the float test, as results are not immediately apparent. You’ll have to wait for approximately 1–2 hours before confirming the results. Some good-quality seeds will need adequate time to absorb enough water for them to sink. Use this time to go water the garden and get some much needed pruning done. Upon your return, any seeds that remain on the surface are most likely not viable and won’t be worth further time and effort.

Some smokers might be pleased to see some cannabis seeds in their bag, and might think themselves lucky. However, finding seeds in a bag is bad for various reasons. For one, this means the grower has messed up and allowed their female plants to be pollinated by an invading male. When flowers are pollinated, they stop producing THC-containing resin and divert their energy toward producing seeds. Secondly, the seeds will have added to the overall weight of the bag, which means less weed for your buck.

This simple and cost-effective method is a great way to tell the good genetics from the bad; they will sink or swim, literally. Seeds that remain buoyant on the surface are more than likely of poor quality and are to be discarded. Seeds that sink to the bottom like a botanical cannonball are probably healthy and should be germinated.

Now that you know how to spot the difference between white seeds and immature seeds, let’s take a look at why some seeds are white, while others are brown or striped. The majority of cannabis strains are indeed brown, which is why there is so much confusion about white seeds.

Have you ever bought some cannabis seeds and found that they were white instead of the usual brown? You might have heard that white seeds are duds. That they won’t grow as well as “normal” seeds. We’re here to nip that myth in the bud! 😉 Read on to learn what the difference is between a white seed and an immature seed and what to expect from your white seeds!

Why Are Some Seeds White?

Being in ‘the business’ for quite some time now, SOMA writes from his own experiences and gathers information from all the people he meets along the way. Some of these people are growers; some users. Some use weed for medical purposes, whilst others just want to smoke and enjoy a good high and a movie on the couch.

Another reason for white seeds can be a genetic mutation. This is why it’s perfectly possible to get a white seed from a strain that normally produces brown seeds. There’s another myth about white seeds, is that they will grow into an all-white plant. This is also worth debunking, your white seeds will grow into normal plants. Albino marijuana plants are extremely rare!

SOMA is a freelance cannabis content writer and a cannabis dispensary owner who knows what he’s talking about. From new medical insights to finding the best grinder; he’s got your back. Providing you with the best, mind-boggling, well-researched articles.