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when is the best time to plant weed seeds outside

Be sure to keep a grow journal to track the progress of your plants. Looking back on your notes will help you learn from mistakes and maximize the quality and quantity of your buds.

We can’t stress enough that the timeframes in the above graphic are ranges of time for the Northern Hemisphere. You’ll need to adjust them based on your specific region and local weather and climate.

Important dates for growing marijuana outdoors

Cannabis plants are considered seedlings until they begin to develop leaves with the full number of blades on new fan leaves. A healthy seedling should be a vibrant green color.

The growth stages of marijuana can be broken down into four primary stages from seed to harvest:

If you’re growing indoors, you can force a weed plant to flower after only a few weeks when it’s small, or after several weeks when it’s big. If you’re growing outdoors, you’re at the whim of the seasons and will have to wait until the sun starts to go down in fall for it to flower and then to harvest.

Hybrids that flower earlier are suggested as the most successful grows, especially in Washington and Oregon. California plants can be put in the ground earlier due to the region’s warmer weather. Your best clue indicating when it’s time to get your plants outdoors is when daylight hours increase and the temperature starts to warm.

When you plant cannabis in this loamy region you’ll never have to worry about rain. However, mold development and lack of sunshine can make growing outdoors a more difficult proposition.

Northwest (Northern CA, OR, WA)

With its rich soils and abundance of water, the northeast region can be a great place to cultivate cannabis outdoors, especially if you choose an early harvest strain that can finish up before fall kicks in. Best time to move your plants outdoors in this region is the middle of April, when days are longer.

If you choose to grow your plants outside in this scorching climate, be prepared to pay attention to the temperature, where highs that regularly exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit will slow your plant’s growth. Sativas and sativa-dominant hybrids do well in this environment because of their lineage tracing back to the equator, where the weather is uniformly hot. Before moving your plants outdoors, make sure the last frost has passed

I t’s amazing how quickly the world can change, isn’t it? In the past 25 years, cannabis has moved from an illicit substance relegated to the shadowy corners of the black market to an “essential” industry because of COVID-19. In many states, local cannabis laws allow you to grow your own, and why not? When you grow your own, you can do your own quality control, know the purity of your product, and manage your own supply. Luckily, no matter where you live in the country, you can start your own grow in a container as small as a flower pot. However, cannabis is a picky plant and will need at least four-to-six hours of light each day and a few months to produce its desired cannabinoid goodness, so there is some variability in the growing season depending on where you live.

From the desert states of Arizona and New Mexico to the more tropical regions such as the Carolinas and Florida, these states benefit from lots of sunshine and warmer weather. In these states, the key to growing cannabis outside in pots is to plant on the earlier side if you’re organized early enough. Place your pots outside as early as March, although April is fine too.

Lots of people would like to know how long it takes to grow a cannabis plant outside. You need this information because you want to get your plant(s) out early enough, but not too early. Unfortunately, there is no simple answer.

A Pot for Pot, on the other hand, makes planning and executing a marijuana home grow super simple. The Complete Grow Kit provides just about everything you need to nurture a successful plant in as few as 80 days. All that’s left for you is selecting your seeds, adding some water, and providing plenty of sunshine.

Northern States

States that are higher altitude and/or have colder winters, such as Colorado, Montana, the Midwest, and the Northeast, also benefit from the shorter growing season of autoflowering plants. The best time to plant might not be until April or May, and that’s okay; the plants will still be ready to harvest before the weather starts getting too cold. In general, it should be safe to bring your plants outside by the time the end of April rolls around. This applies to the majority of states in the North, although you might want to bring them indoors at night when the risk of nighttime frost still exists.

Northwestern states, especially Oregon and Washington, have to deal with rain as one of the biggest concerns. The best time to grow cannabis outside here is in early spring, which can be different from year to year, depending on the weather, but primarily meaning March or April. Sometimes May can be a good time to start, depending on how cool the weather has been that year. Keep in mind, autoflowering plants have a shorter growing time, so waiting until the later side is not a bad idea for these strains. This helps ensure good weather and more sunshine from the get-go.

For many, the idea of outdoor growing paints a mental picture of working in your backyard or a community garden, tending lovingly to your plants every day. But this is not always possible, either because you want to keep your plants discreet or because you simply don’t have space for it. Even if you don’t have the best place to grow cannabis outside, a Pot for Pot Complete Kits can help. Simply set your potted plant on your balcony or patio. Of course, you don’t need a kit to grow a potted plant. However, if you choose to ‘do-it-yourself,’ you’d have to plan, buy, and assemble everything yourself as well. With that comes the opportunity to make critical mistakes that could ruin your entire investment. If you’re only going to grow one or two plants, don’t you want to ensure that they succeed and produce something worth your effort?

Includes Northwestern states (Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado), the Midwest (Minnesota, Iowa, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota), the Northeast (including New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, Maryland, and Pennsylvania), and Alaska.