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weed with no seeds

Today, marijuana users are spoiled by a combination of easy access and extremely high-quality bud. Past generations relied on low-grade schwag illegally smuggled into the country. Today’s cannabis consumers can walk into a dispensary and buy the best weed they can afford.

It is now so easy to grow high-quality marijuana that users are becoming picky. High THC strains are common, so it is now a question of finding weed with the right aroma and taste. It is marijuana’s aromatic terpene compounds that are mainly responsible for their flavors and scents.

The increase in the quality of weed is mainly down to legality and availability. However, cannabis cultivators have also learned more effective and efficient growing techniques.

When Did We First Gain Access to Sinsemilla?

As a result, very few people risked growing weed in North America and Europe until the 1960s. At that time, breeders walked the famous ‘hippy trail’ and began taking seeds back from Asia.

One expert likened the process to the creation of ice cream. There are lots of flavors, but ultimately, ice cream is just sugar and frozen milk. Our association with sweet items guides the selection and breeding of modern-day growers.

The rationale behind this was that unfertilized female flowers would remain high in resin and develop larger branched flower clusters. Breeders were delighted to find that sinsemilla cannabis had at least twice the THC of fertilized weed. Also, depending on the strain, the THC level could be up to ten times higher.

In the past, weed was full of seeds making for a harsh smoking experience and relatively low THC.

Truth was, of course, that it was still the same weed from the same strains. The only difference was in how it was cultivated. What’s more, this alleged new kind of powerful cannabis fuelled anti-cannabis propaganda, as weed suddenly became more “dangerous” in the eyes of the establishment.

That said, the first interpretation that sinsemilla stands for darn good and very potent weed isn’t so wrong. Indeed, seedless cannabis is more potent, tastes better, and is simply of overall higher quality than weed full of seeds.

In the same way that some weed lovers in the UK freely use the word “Skunk” to describe top-notch bud, so too do some folks use “sinsemilla” to describe special varieties of super-potent weed that come from places like Amsterdam. Here’s what sinsemilla really means.

TURNS OUT, SINSEMILLA IS THE BETTER WEED

If you’re interested in cannabis and cannabis culture (and we have an inkling you may well be…), chances are you’ve come across the word “sinsemilla”. Interestingly enough, there is some confusion among people as to what sinsemilla really means.

If you love cannabis, you’ve probably come across the word sinsemilla. Is sinsemilla some special kind of cannabis? Where does it come from? Read on to find out!

Once breeders found out that separating male plants from the females resulted in seedless buds of much better quality, we never looked back.

As knowledge spread that seedless cannabis flowers made for a far better product, growers started focusing on producing sinsemilla exclusively, culling male plants as soon as they could. If they required seeds for breeding, they kept the sexes strictly separated and only allowed pollination of select female plants in dedicated areas.

If it’s very seedy the buds may not feel as potent, though a few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency. The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If it is seedless, you will get a lot more bang for your buck. Seedless bud (sinsemilla) is considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.

There’s a seed in my bud!

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

Are seeds good to grow?

Seeds are the result of pollination. That means the seedy cannabis buds (which come from a female plant) may have come into contact with pollen from a male plant. Therefore, it’s possible the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before the released pollen. It’s also possible that the plant self-pollinated (sometimes called herming) which is often the result of plant stress during the budding phase but can also be caused by genetics.

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

It should be dark and relatively hard. Very pale or white seeds, that can be easily crushed between the fingers, usually won’t sprout. However, I have been surprised to find some very flimsy seeds sprout and produce amazing plants (we aren’t breeding them for hard seeds after all) so when in doubt, I highly recommend doing the true test to see if the seed is viable – try to germinate the seed and see if it sprouts!