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weed and seed seattle

Are you looking for an easier way to grow your own cannabis? Autoflower seeds may be the solution you’re looking for. With a shorter vegetation period than regular seeds, autoflower seeds grow buds at a faster rate which means you can enjoy your flower that much quicker. Autoflower plants don’t rely on specific light cycles and will grow regardless of the amount of sunlight they receive. Regular seeds can require costly light equipment in order to properly grow.

Are you looking for more of a creative slant in your Seattle adventures? Have fun and explore the Seattle Art Museum or become inspired in Olympic Sculpture Park. While you embrace your artistic side enjoy some bruce banner autoand create the moment. Flowering time for these seeds is 7-9 weeks. THC content is 23-28% which makes this green budded monster a perfect addition to your day.

Autoflower Seeds: A Buyers Guide

I49 Washington has what you need to get your home grow started. I49 Seed Bank has a wide range of germination guaranteed feminized and autoflowering seeds for sale. Expect exceptional customer service and an extensive supply of strains.Take a look through our catalogue and find the seeds that suit your weed needs.

It can be a long day on your feet exploring all that Seattle has to offer, so treat yourself to the purple punch strainif you’re looking to wind down and relieve those aches and pains. Enjoy the vanilla, blueberry, and grape aromas of this appetizing indica . THC content is 17-20% which makes this a nice strain to end of the day. The plant will mature within 8-10 weeks. Find your perfect strain to complement your Seattle days and nights at I49 Cannabis Seeds.

Spend the day chilling out with your favorite java drink by the ivy-covered buildings of Pioneer Square. Sit back, take in the sights and pair your fresh coffee with the citrus cookie dough flavors of tropicana cookies. This tasty, sativa dominant strain is a treat for the senses and it is a great pick for those looking for an uplifting high. The plant produces beautiful, purple buds with dark green and orange hairs. The plant will flower in approximately 9 weeks and provide 21-22% THC content.

Seattle is among the cities to win a federal law-enforcement grant for the inner city called the Weed and Seed program, Mayor Norm Rice’s office announced today.

The $1.1 million program grant has been under attack for the past two weeks by numerous Central Area community groups, who fear the additional money would mean harassment of young African Americans.

Two-thirds of the money Seattle receives will go for law enforcement and one-third for social services, including programs to help teenagers prepare for jobs and find work.

“We really view this grant as an extension of our existing community police team efforts, providing more resources for the community and our police to utilize in their joint efforts to promote neighborhood safety,” said Rice.

A community advisory council of residents and business owners from the Central Area will “provide input and oversight for law enforcement and social-service initiatives under the grant,” he added.

Nevertheless, the Crawford-Roberts neighborhood experienced decreases in crime within four years of strategy implementation, and residents perceived improvements neighborhood safety and quality of life (Bynum et. al. 1999). A cross-site analysis (Dunworth et al. 1999) showed similar findings in four other neighborhoods. This crime reduction trend is also evident in a more recent study of homicide rates, which found that, 55% of the two hundred and twenty Weed and Seed site respondents reported a decline in homicide rates from the time period between 1996 and 2001 (O’Connell, Perkins and Zepp 2003).

Western and Beckett (1999) identify a key paradox in the short and long-term labor market effects of theUSprison system. Prisoners are excluded from unemployment figures in theUnited States, deflating the unemployment rate and creating the illusion of a stronger economy in the short-run. But because incarceration reduces job prospects for ex-offenders, they argue that consequences of a rapidly expanding penal system are sustained long-term unemployment and deepening social inequality: “Incarceration . . . deepens inequality because its effects are increasingly detrimental for young black and unskilled men, whose incarceration rates are highest and whose market power is weak” (1031). This unemployment contradiction marks the potential long-term negative impact on recidivism in targeted neighborhoods.

While many of the Weed and Seed sites are selected on the basis of high crime rates and high density of indicators of poverty (unemployment and income status) (Miller 2001), outcomes measuring the latter are not widely publicized in available program materials. The evaluation of the Crawford-Roberts reports little to no improvement in unemployment (Bynum et. al. 1999), and the cross-site analysis (Dunworth et. al1999) omits these outcomes all together. In sum, while reduced crime rates and improved community perception indicate some success, the absence of data regarding the economic wellbeing of communities suggest that such success is perhaps too narrowly defined.

Each Weed and Seed site has a designated a Grantee Organization, which is responsible for program coordination and implementation. Steering committees are charged with designing the program and, often chaired by officials such as an attorney general or mayor, consist of a mix of public sector representatives and community members (Dunworth et. al. 1999). For example, the Crawford-Roberts Weed and Seed site inPittsburghhad a task force that consisted of members from the local police department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and the Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS) (Bynum et. al. 1999).

Bynum, Timothy, Gregory Mills and Kristen Jacoby. 1999. National evaluation of weed and seed: Pittsburgh case study. Washington,D.C.:U.S. Department of Justice, National InstituteofJustice.