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scotts weed and seed instructions

Choose a weed-and-feed product based on the type of grass you have. Grass species have different nutrient requirements, so not all of them are safe for every species of grass. Using the wrong product can damage your grass.

Selecting a fertilizer and weed killer that’s compatible with your grass species will give you far better results. Different nutrients have different effects on your lawn, from enhancing color to developing stronger root systems. Additionally, since many products include herbicides or weed preventatives, it’s important to know the types of weeds that come up in your lawn.

Excessive fertilizing can result in lawn burn, which is when the nitrogen and salt levels in the soil are too high and cause yellow to brown strips or patches of dead grass. A lawn, as with any type of plant, only needs fertilizing if the soil lacks the vital nutrients to help it grow. In situations like these, fertilizing your soil is essential.

What to Consider When Choosing the Best Weed and Feed

Keeping your lawn looking lush and green means that you need to weed frequently and apply fertilizer at the right times of the year. Altogether, it can be an energy- and time-consuming exercise, especially if you have a large yard. Although you may be able to dig up a clump of crabgrass or dandelion by hand on occasion, it’s not plausible to hand-weed or fertilize an entire lawn regularly.

Weed-and-feed products come in two forms: liquid and granular. Although the liquid forms are easier to apply and provide faster results, it’s more economical to use the granular form. Spray or liquid weed and feed are designed for small yards.

Cool-season turfgrasses grow best with average soil temperatures between 60 and 75 Fahrenheit. Cool-season grasses thrive in the cooler climates of the Midwest and Northern regions of the United States. Some cool-season grasses are Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, and tall and hard fescue.

Granular weed and feed covers more area, often 5,000 square feet or more, and are available in 18-lb bags and larger. Granular versions offer a better value for your money, but you do need to water your lawn after application for it to penetrate the grass.

As always, we would recommend that you read the manufacturers directions included on the packaging. (If all else fails, read the instructions!).

An estimated 25 million pounds of weed ‘n feed is applied by Americans and landscaping professionals to; home lawns, parks, cemeteries and anywhere else grass is found, each year. It is in fact one of the most used lawn care products today, given the sheer convenience it provides when trying to get rid of a weed strewn lawn.

If you’re applying a liquid weed and feed product such as Scotts Liquid Turf Builder, you don’t need to water the lawn after application, since both the fertilizer and herbicide are already in liquid form. The nitrogen acts as the fertilizer, and gives your lawn a boost, while the herbicide kills weeds such as ground ivy, chickweed, and buckhorn.

Should I Mow Before Applying Weed and Feed?

If you can afford the irrigation system cost, don’t forget to turn off that zone or zones for 24 hours after, and remember to turn it back on again afterwards!

You should also note that even if you apply the best product, chances are that you won’t be able to get rid of all the weeds completely. Reason being weed seeds can spread fast, whether it’s kids running across the lawn, wind blowing them around or birds depositing them.

Considering weed and feed products contain chemicals, there are a few safety precautions you need to take, starting with making sure kids and pets stay off the lawn until it dries completely. It is best to wait until the next heavy rain or when the granules have completely dissolved before allowing foot traffic on your lawn.

If you have large broad leafed weeds, and are using a post-emergent product, then it’s best not to mow too short before putting down weed and feed, better to have a larger leaf area for the product to work on.

Check the grass to make sure that it is slightly wet from the morning dew. If the grass is dry you will need to sprinkle it lightly before applying the fertilizer. The moisture enables the fertilizer to stick to the blades of grass and to the weeds.

Set the gauge on the spreader according to the setting gauge chart on the bag of Scotts Weed and Feed. There are two types of spreaders, rotary or broadcast spreaders and drop spreaders. The spreaders have settings on them to control how much fertilizer is dropped. The correct setting will be listed on the fertilizer bag.

Apply the fertilizer following the directions on your spreader. Do not overlap your application as it will apply too much fertilizer in one area and there is a possibility of burning the grass. Do not stop in one spot with the release lever open, as this will also send a concentrated amount of fertilizer in one spot–burning the grass.

Fill the hopper with fertilizer. Fill it while on a sidewalk or driveway as you do not want to get a concentrated amount of fertilizer on the lawn should you spill some.

Check the weather forecast before applying the Scotts product. Rain should not be forecasted for at least 24 hours after applying the fertilizer. Do not water your lawn for 24 hours after applying the weed and feed. Also, the fertilizer should be applied when there is little or no wind–otherwise there is a possibility that the fertilizer will be blown on plants and shrubs.