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one year’s seeding makes seven years weeding

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Warning of the danger of allowing weeds to grow and seed themselves: also used figuratively. □ 1866Rural American 1 .

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Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

On the danger of allowing weeds to grow and seed themselves: also used figuratively. □ 1866 Rural American 1 Dec. .

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Reference requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can”t find the answer there, please contact us.

To have a long broccoli harvest period, we use several varieties with different days-to-maturity, and two sowing dates. This gives us the longest possible harvest period before it just gets too hot for pleasant-tasting broccoli.

There is a “Keep the Soil in Organic” movement, which advocates for Organic certification requiring plants to be grown in soil, not water-plus-some-nutrients. Dave Chapman sent me this message asking for support for the National Organic Standards Board on 3/27/17:

Rolling hay over newspaper for a new strawberry bed.
Photo Luke Stovall

Transplanting into hay or straw mulch, organic myth-busting, keep soil in Organic

The items are free to download, for any healthy food related events you might be organizing. Or just go and read them, so that next time someone asks you a question about organic farming, you’ll have the answers at your fingertips.

Here I’ll say more about transplanting into hay or straw mulch, which I have also written about for Mother Earth News. Transplanting into rolled out or pre-spread straw or hay from small square bales is quicker, easier and more effective than fitting the mulch around the transplants after you’ve planted them.

No time to lose on that one! Big hydroponic “organic” industries have lobbied and got included as certifiably Organic, when most of us realize that growing food without soil is the opposite of Organic, with or without a capital O.

Spring cabbage planted in hay mulch, a few weeks after transplanting.
Photo Kathryn Simmons