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marijuana sproutling

Flowering stage length: 8-11 weeks

Be sure to keep a grow journal to track the progress of your plants. Looking back on your notes will help you learn from mistakes and maximize the quality and quantity of your buds.

When your marijuana plant becomes a seedling, you’ll notice it developing more of the traditional cannabis fan leaves. As a sprout, the seed will initially produce leaves with only one ridged blade. Once new growth develops, the leaves will develop more blades (3, 5, 7, etc.). A mature cannabis plant will have between 5 or 7 blades per leaf, but some plants may have more.

Vegetative stage

We can’t stress enough that the timeframes in the above graphic are ranges of time for the Northern Hemisphere. You’ll need to adjust them based on your specific region and local weather and climate.

Within the flowering stage, there are three subphases:

There are a number of changes to consider once plants go from the vegetative stage to the flowering stage:

The flowering stage is the final stage of growth for a cannabis plant. This is when plants start to develop resinous buds and your hard work will be realized. Most strains flower in 8-9 weeks, but some can take even longer, especially some sativas.

Soon, you should notice your seedlings developing healthier growth. Short internodes and compact, green foliage are all signs that your seedlings are growing perfectly.

To meet these requirements, we recommend using one 12W CFL bulb per 1–2 seedlings. Keep the bulb 5–7.5cm (2–3in) from the top of the seedlings and monitor their growth carefully, making sure the plants don’t make contact with the bulbs.

More precisely, cannabis seedlings benefit from nitrate-derived nitrogen. Unlike ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen is a lot easier for plants to absorb and fuels shorter, bushier vegetative growth. If your seedlings are stretching despite ideal light conditions, we highly recommend checking the ammoniacal nitrogen content in your soil and fertiliser.

Another cause of leggy seedlings is heat.

In optimal conditions, the seed shell, or husk, will crack open and a taproot will pop out, immediately digging further down in search of a water lifeline. Soon, you will see a sprout rise from the under the soil, spread out its first baby leaves (cotyledons), and then you will start noticing the first set of true leaves. Leaves have an equally important job as the taproot, but they are in search of another food source – light. Quite literally, a plant uses light to digest what it brings up from the soil.

Cannabis plants grow very quickly and will naturally compete with one another for space, light, and nutrients. So, while you may have been taught to think that more plants will naturally translate into bigger, better harvests—that might not be the case. In fact, many experienced growers opt to cull their weakest seedlings and only grow those plants that show the healthiest growth. This way, they focus their efforts on the plants most likely to produce the best flowers.

Thinning is a common agricultural technique that’s often forgotten among cannabis growers. As the name suggests, thinning is all about reducing competition among your plants by “thinning” out the population.

Note: Some growers try tying their stretchy seedlings to a stake. We do not recommend this method, as it doesn’t do anything to combat the weak, overgrown stem or the difficulty it’ll present further along in the grow.

Choosing the right pot is an essential part of caring for your growing plant. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Nutrient deficiencies can come from a variety of places. “Hot” potting mixes that contain too many nutrients could cause nutrient toxicity. On the other end of the spectrum, under-watering can cause a deficiency in the key nutrients your plant needs to grow.

Be mindful of how much you water your cannabis seedlings

But what does that care look like? What are the key things to know when it comes to how to take care of marijuana seedlings?

Growing your seedlings indoors with artificial light gives you more control over the process, making it easier to ensure your plants are getting enough light each day. If you’re growing with artificial lights (compact fluorescent lights that emit cooler, blue spectrum light are especially effective), aim to give your plants 18 hours on and six hours off each day.

If you notice any of these issues with your plant, it could be the result of too many or too few nutrients. You’ll need to adjust your growing strategy to support your plant’s health.