Posted on

i am a weed i come from seed song

Not too long, just the right height So what is it that’s hiding By the garden edge It’s a different kind of flower And this is what is says I am a weed I grow from seed I am a weed W E E D I can cover the garden, given half the chance You’d better watch out, cause weeds are about To lead you a Merry dance The garden looks so pretty As the bumblebees fly by The borders neatly tended And everything looks so spry So what is it that’s hiding By the garden edge It’s a different kind of flower And this is what is says I am a weed I grow from seed I am a weed W E E D I can cover the garden, given half the chance You’d better watch out, cause weeds are about To lead you a Merry dance I am a weed I grow from seed I am a weed W E E D I can cover the garden, given half the chance You’d better watch out, cause weeds are about To lead you a Merry dance

If this doesn’t make you feel like you’re chilling on the beach with a joint in your hand, then you probably shouldn’t have read this article.

Back when Snoop went through his Rastafarian phase, he was actually putting out some dope music.

Although we remember him more these days for those hilarious "Chappelle’s Show" skits, Rick James was making music that your parents were turning up to.

Methodman and Redman – "How High" (2001)

It’s a tough job that requires a lot of love, self-control and patience. It also requires miles of rolling papers, lighters for days and some iron lungs.

The track was also featured in "Soul Plane," AKA one of the greatest movies of all time.

Before he was busy being in the movies and being a grown ass man, Ludacris was making party tracks that most of us were too young to get turnt to.

Of course, "Stay High" is a classic but their song "Where Is The Bud" posed a pressing question that every stoner asks themselves every day.

An unapologetic ditching of typical romantic tropes, Ashley Monroe’s “Weed Instead of Roses” is an irreverent note to a long-time partner, hoping to spice up the relationship a bit. The artist takes a bold approach to a common real-life situation — getting stuck in a rut with your spouse or long-term significant other — and suggests trying some less conventional tactics. “Bring me weed instead of roses, whiskey instead of wine,” she sings. “I don’t need a card from Hallmark, box of chocolates, Heaven knows, bring me weed instead of roses, and let’s see where it goes.” The lighthearted, flirty tune has a traditional country spin, as does the video, which looks like it was filmed in the early '80s. “Let’s go call your no-good brother, we both know what he’s been growin’,” Monroe continues, unashamedly propositioning some Mary Jane to change up the routine. The song, co-written by Monroe, was released as the third single from her record Like a Rose in 2013.

Everyone from Zac Brown Band to Kacey Musgraves is referencing smoking weed in their tunes lately, if not directly writing songs centered around the typically illicit activity. Amid discussions nationwide of legalizing the drug, artists like Willie Nelson have become well-known advocates in recent years, and many other country artists feel similarly.

Hank Williams, Jr. wrote this lament about a lost love for his 1990 album Lone Wolf, and its desperation still shines through the lyrics and Williams’ voice today. The narrator of “Stoned at the Jukebox" is left devastated by a girl who left, but manages to get by during the day. Unfortunately, the night eventually comes and he turns to vices to get him through, leaving him “stoned at the jukebox” listening to sad songs and wallowing in his pain. It doesn’t reveal whether marijuana helped him out at all, but it does imply it played a role in his recovery, for better or for worse. The song was not a single for Williams, but it’s got his trademark style and a focus on lighting up that earns it a slot in our Top 10.

“Weed With Willie”

For Florida Georgia Line, there’s such thing as a perfect day, and for them that means wearing flip flops and shades, drinking Jack and Coke, and getting stoned. The artists’ tune “Sun Daze” is a summer anthem dedicated to that state of mind, and smoking pot seems to be an integral part of the itinerary. In the music video, the band takes full advantage of the summer to do all of those things and more, hanging out by the pool, doing a slip-n-slide and drinking with friends. The tune is off the band’s Anything Goes album and was released as its second single in September 2014, hitting No. 1 on the Billboard Country Airplay chart and No. 3 on the Hot Country Songs chart.

Though it wasn’t always the case, Willie Nelson has become the official champion of marijuana usage in country music, and Toby Keith reinforced this sentiment with his tune “Weed with Willie.” Inspired by Keith and co-writer Scotty Emerick’s experiences at Farm Aid with Nelson, it tells of a backstage hang out with the icon, who offered the new guys a “fat boy and he passed it around.” Apparently it was too strong for the songwriters, who vowed to "never smoke weed with Willie again.” The song ends, however, with them giving in, saying they lay in the fetal position, drooling, because they “broke down and smoked weed with Willie again.” The tune appeared on Keith’s album Shock’n Y’all as one of two special live tracks with Emerick.

Whether it’s mentioned in passing as a way to relax and party or championed as a solution for many of life’s ills, marijuana is a focal point for many songwriters in today’s country landscape. We’ve put together a list of some of the best.

Jamey Johnson’s “High Cost of Living” is more of a cautionary tale about marijuana and other drugs than a celebratory one, telling a personal story about his struggle with addiction and eventually overcoming it. The song describes his life in a haze, with no real grasp on reality or what he was giving up by staying high all the time. “My life was just an old routine, every day the same damn thing, I couldn’t even tell I was alive,” Johnson sings of this time in his life. “The high cost of living ain’t nothing like the cost of living high,” he concludes. The song was Johnson’s second single off his third studio record released in 2008, titled The Lonesome Song. It was rated No. 38 on Rolling Stone’s list of the top 100 songs from that year, and peaked at No. 34 on the country charts.