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how to plant grass seed and kill weeds

Many people will spread hay over new grass seed to protect it as it starts to grow. Often hay will contain weed seeds or hay seeds. Use a paper pellet mulch instead to keep your new grass weed free, protect it, and lock in moisture!

This depends on the time of year. Weeds tend to really thrive and spread during the middle of summer. The middle of summer is also the worst time to plant grass seed.

Apply the fertilizer first. Weed and feed contains an herbicide that will kill off existing weeds in about two weeks. This will give your new grass more room to grow and thrive!

Water your soil well

Wait until the grass is 3-4 inches tall before mowing for the first time. Avoid weed killers until the grass is established, as well.

If you do see any weeds pop up in the grass seed area, pull them right away! Don’t use a weed killer quite yet. Your new grass can’t handle an herbicide at this stage.

Surprisingly, planting more grass is helpful to fend off the weeds! If those annoying weeds have less area to grow, they won’t spring up as fast. You asked, and I answered. Find out everything you need to know about weeds and grass seed!

Weeds will dominate any thin areas of lawns! Try to catch thin areas of the lawn in the spring when the weeds are just starting to take over. This is a great time to apply new grass seed and choke out the weeds!

Till the top 6 inches of soil with a soil tiller. You can rent or purchase soil tillers at home improvement centers and rental yards. After the tiller turns under the dead weeds and soil, rake the soil with a garden rake to level the area as much as possible. Remove large rocks and break up clumps of soil.

Trying to grow grass in a weeded area is a frustrating task that generally provides undesirable results. Weeds are aggressive and invasive plants that choke out grass and flowers. They quickly take over an area and are notoriously hard to get rid of. When you choose to grow grass in an area overrun by weeds, you essentially have to start fresh by establishing new turf.

Apply a thin layer – about 1/4 inch – of high-quality topsoil over the grass seed. Applying too thick and the seeds have a hard time germinating. Attach a garden hose sprayer with a mist option to a water hose. Dampen the top 6 inches of the soil with the water hose set on mist. Using a mist of water instead of a stream will prevent the seeds from washing away.

Cover the soil with the correct grass seed for your location and the amount needed to cover the area. For example, some parts of the San Francisco Bay area work best with warm-season grasses — such as St. Augustine, buffalo or zoysia grass — while other Bay areas thrive with cool-season grasses such as tall fescue and perennial rye. Use your gloved hands to distribute the seeds evenly over areas smaller than 150 square feet. For larger areas, use a seed spreader.

Remove the weeds from the area by either manually pulling them out of the ground or applying weed killer to the area. Hand-pulling weeds is safer for the soil, but removing all the roots can be difficult. Chemical weed killer kills the weeds and their roots, but may damage grass seed and leave pesticide residue in the soil, if you plant the seeds too soon after the herbicide application. If you choose to use weed killer, wait 2 to 3 weeks before planting new grass seed.

Continue watering the soil two to three times a day until the seeds have germinated and the grass is about 1/2-inch high. After germination occurs, you can cut back watering to once every day or two. Never let the seeds dry out.

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