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grass seed weed killer combo

Avoid the need for weed preventers by keeping your lawn healthy. Once established, only water your turf once a week during the growing season. Up to 1 inch of water during this watering session allows roots to search deeply for moisture to create strong grass. Shallow grass roots die in stressful conditions, like drought, and allow weeds to grow in thinned spots. Allow your turf to grow to a healthy height as well, typically between 1 and 3 inches, depending on the species. Long grass blades mean the grass can produce enough energy to stay healthy and compete with weeds. In short, healthy and well-maintained grass has less problems with weed growth.

Even if you time your weed preventer and seeding periods correctly, you need to do the job right to get an even lawn with no bare patches. Apply seeds uniformly across your yard using a drop spreader on a mild fall day. Spread up to 1-inch of organic mulch over the seeds to conserve moisture and encourage germination. Water the seeds at least twice a day for short, 10-minute sessions. You do not want to wash away the seeds, but they need consistent moisture to grow. Hand pull any weeds that appear while the grass seedlings develop. Do not apply any chemicals for weed control.

Cool-season grasses are usually seeded, as opposed to warm-season grasses that usually need to be grown from sod or plugs. Because cool-season grass seeds germinate best in fall, apply your chemical preventer in spring to actively kill off weeds in spring and summer. In general, temperatures between 65 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit are good for weed preventer application. Hot days often cause the chemicals to vaporize into the atmosphere, reducing their effectiveness. By the time fall seeding weather arrives, the chemicals are no longer active and the grass seeds will be able to sprout.

Seed Correctly

Chemical weed preventers, also called preemergent herbicides, are usually granules or liquids, but both require water to work. As the preventer soaks into the ground, it leaves a residual film in the top 1-inch of soil. Because most seeds germinate at or just below the soil’s surface, these preemergent herbicides remain active against any germination processes for up to four months, depending on the chemicals involved. Organic weed preventers work in a similar way. With many weeds being members of the grass family, all seeds, including desired lawn species, fail to germinate and sprout after you’ve used a weed preventer.

Spreading seed is an inexpensive way to grow a lush lawn, but exposed soil between germination and establishment makes it vulnerable to weeds. Although chemical weed preventers have different mixtures and instructions, you should not apply them while seeding or immediately afterward. You must allow one to four months between applying this type of chemical and spreading seed.

Writing professionally since 2010, Amy Rodriguez cultivates successful cacti, succulents, bulbs, carnivorous plants and orchids at home. With an electronics degree and more than 10 years of experience, she applies her love of gadgets to the gardening world as she continues her education through college classes and gardening activities.

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I'm in the same boat. Big patches of clover, Creeping Charlie and dandelions — and various bare patches. Not as concerned about chemicals, as I don't have pets or children.

Something safe, huh? I'd say go with hand tools and grass seed. But I'm one of those hippies who believes the WHO about the dangers of glyphosate.

I have dandelions, crabgrass and clovers of some kind in my yard and bald patches. I'd like to use something to kill the weeds and grow new grass. Also, I have dogs so I need something safe. What are the best products to use? Thanks!

Anywhere you put down a crabgrass preventative or weed control, you will not be growing grass there. Best time to seed your lawn is in the fall, that way they sprout come spring time, and then you can apply weed and crab grass control. Seeds will not germinate of you apply crabgrass preventative. Cannot stress that enough. You will have seed the worst areas and fertilize. Apply fertilizer with crabgrass preventative in it to the areas you are not seeding. Weed control can wait til next month. Seeding the worst areas and applying crabgrass control to the rest of your lawn is the priority. And of course water 20 minutes per zone daily for best results. Any amount less than this will give you less than perfect results.