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dove weed seed

Doveweed or turkey mullein (Croton setiger) is a low growing, native annual that thrives in dry, disturbed, open places, such as on Stonebridge Mesa. Even from a distance it can be recognized by the low, tidy mounds of pale green foliage, themselves evenly spaced out into large patches and fields.

The fruit is a dried capsule that splits into two valves from the tip. The outer wall of the capsule consists of two structures and appears two-layered. There is usually a single seed, about 1/8 inch (3-4 mm) long; it is a smooth ellipsoid, somewhat triangular in cross section and variously mottled or striped in tans, browns or grays, or occasionally solid.

Other Common Names:

Stonebridge Mesa | June 2019

Species from the genus Croton should not be confused with the colorful, tropical houseplant with the common name croton (Codiaeum variegatum).

dove weed, turkey mullein

Male and female flowers on the same plant. Small and inconspicuous.
Ovary – 1 celled with 1 ovule. Hairy. 1 thread like, hairy style.
Perianth – Female flowers have none. Males have sepals.
Sepals – Male. 5-6, slightly overlapping, 2 mm long.
Petals – none.
Stamens – 5-6. Filaments bent inward when in bud and straighten as the flower opens.
Anthers –

Flowering times:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Other names:

Eremocarpus setiger
Courtesy Australia’s Virtual Herbarium.

This weed has two key characteristics that make it successful. First, its seeds germinate late during the spring when soil temperatures reach 65-70°F. This represents a problem because at this time the effect of preemergence (PRE) herbicides applied in February or March might be too low to provide good doveweed control. Second, the leaves of this weed can be confused with St. Augustinegrass and centipedegrass leaves, and many people do not notice doveweed until the plants are large and are displacing the turf. Doveweed leaves are thick with a shiny rubbery texture. The plant produces creeping stems (stolons), and mowers can break these stolons spreading this weed across the field.

Figure 2. Individual doveweed plant showing flowers, fruits, and stolons with root in nodes.

Doveweed is easier to control before emergence than when plants are well established. Atrazine is one of the most effective herbicides to control doveweed. A maximum rate of 1 lb. of active ingredient (ai) per acre (A) and no more than 2 lb. ai per year are recommended to achieve both adequate control and avoid turfgrass injury. Atrazine should be applied right before or soon after doveweed emerges to maximize control.

Doveweed (Murdannia nudiflora) is a summer annual weed species that belongs to the dayflower family. Over the last three years, this weed has become an important weed problem in residential lawns and sod production.

For PRE control, S-metolachlor (Pennant Magnum™), dimethenamid-P (Tower™), and indaziflam (Specticle™) are herbicides that can considerably reduce doveweed establishment, especially if the application is done closer to doveweed emergence timing. These herbicides also provide good control of other important weed species such as crabgrass and goosegrass, which emerge earlier in the spring. In order to control early emerging weeds and doveweed, split applications are preferred. For example, the first application is done at the end of February or early March and the second one 4 to 6 weeks after. In this way, we can extend PRE control until doveweed starts emerging.