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does scotts weed and feed kill grass seed

The Scotts website question-and-answer section states that grass seeds should be allowed to germinate and grow tall and strong enough to be mowed four times before you apply weed and feed. No entirely specific time period is provided, because different grass species grow at different rates, and growth is affected by many variables, including soil quality, temperature and rainfall or manual irrigation.

A well-kept, healthy lawn should be plush, free of weeds and diseases, and as green as the neighbors’ envious hearts. Weed and feed products are designed to provide needed nutrients to the grass while poisoning weeds that want to steal the lawn’s food. Scotts Super Turf Builder with Plus 2 Weed Control works on several species of lawn grasses. While the company’s website recommends waiting four weeks to put down grass seed after applying the weed and feed, seeding first means waiting a different length of time before you use the product.

Timing Is Everything

Before applying any fertilizer or herbicide product, put on a mask, safety goggles, gloves, long sleeves, long pants and closed toe shoes. After applying the weed and feed and cleaning the spreader, wash your clothing in hot water and detergent to remove any dust or residue.

This turf builder weed and feed should be applied with a mechanical spreader for even distribution. When using a spreader, Scotts Turf Builder Plus 2 spreader settings vary depending on the device. Set broadcast and rotary spreaders at 3.5, hand-held spreaders on 3 and drop spreaders on 5. Even if you’ve used the turf builder products for years, always check the package directions to ensure that the instructions haven’t changed.

If you are unable to find Super Turf Builder Weed and Feed, Scotts Turf Builder Triple Action provides similar results. It kills weeds, prevents the new weeds from sprouting and feeds the grass.

Before you plant grass seed, you should always prepare the area by removing any weeds that may be growing in the location. Even with careful preparation of the planting site, weeds can still develop among the newly planted grass seed. Weed killers, however, can harm grass seeds and seedlings if applied too early or improperly.

Some pre-emergent herbicides can safely be used during seeding and usually come mixed with a seed starter. These products have the active ingredient Siduron – also known as Tupersan – that works by suppressing weed seeds while improving root development of the new grass. The fertilizer and pre-emergent herbicide mix is applied with a drop or rotary spreader using a rate of 2 1/2 pounds per 1,000 square feet. The spreader setting and actual application depends on the brand of starter fertilizer plus weed control you use, and you should always follow the instructions found on the label.

Application Timing

You can control weeds in newly planted grass seed and seedlings without the use of herbicides. Manually pulling the weeds by hand when they first appear keeps them from producing seeds and prevents the problematic plants from spreading, according to the University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program website. They suggest keeping the newly planted grass weed free with proper mowing, irrigation and fertilization. Since newly planted turfgrass has short roots, keep the root zone moist by watering the soil lightly. However, avoid over saturating the soil. After the turfgrass has become established, promote deep and healthy root growth by watering infrequently but deeply.

A general rule of thumb is to wait at least until you have mowed the new grass four times before using any standard postemergent broadleaf herbicide. A standard pre-emergent herbicide should not be applied until at least three to four months after seeding the area.

Weed management should be completed before seeding the lawn with a non-selective herbicide seven to 14 days before you till the soil. A second application of the herbicide may be required to kill any weeds you missed during the first treatment. Wait another seven days until tilling the soil if a second application is used.

Weed-and-feed products come in two forms: liquid and granular. Although the liquid forms are easier to apply and provide faster results, it’s more economical to use the granular form. Spray or liquid weed and feed are designed for small yards.

Many fertilizers also have built-in herbicides or weed preventatives. Some products are better at killing certain types of weeds and pests than others. In general, most weed and feed target common types of broadleaf weeds including plantain, chickweed, creeping charlie, dandelions, and clover.

Types of Weed and Feed

Fertilizers can also contain secondary elements and micronutrients needed for healthy growth such as sulfur, calcium, magnesium, boron, iron, molybdenum, zinc, copper, chloride, nickel, and manganese.

To find out exactly what nutrients your lawn needs can be determined by conducting a soil test. You can either purchase a test to use at home or take a soil sample to your local cooperative extension testing office.

Excessive fertilizing can result in lawn burn, which is when the nitrogen and salt levels in the soil are too high and cause yellow to brown strips or patches of dead grass. A lawn, as with any type of plant, only needs fertilizing if the soil lacks the vital nutrients to help it grow. In situations like these, fertilizing your soil is essential.